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. critics say it's all because russia's president is making a political ploy. we speak with a family about their efforts to adopt a russian child and what the move means to them. pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> russia set to ban american families from adopting russian children and dozens of orphans about to be adopted in the u.s. will have to stay in russia. putin will sign the bill named after a russian boy to died of heatstroke after his adoptive american family forgot him in a locked car. some say it's retaliation for a u.s. crackdown on russians suspected of human rights abuse. critics accuse of creme kremlin of playing politics at the expense of hundreds of thousands of children. americans adopted more children from russia than almost anywhere else in the world. kurt and ann adopted their son from russia in 2007 and have been trying to adopt from there again. i can see you have ben on set,
it better we could come closer to solving the problem it has to do with turkey and russia. explain it to me. >> the bottom line there is old historical triangle between turkey, syria and russia. until we break the triangle we'll not solve the problem. the reason the assad regime has been able to perpetrate genocide against its own people, 50,000 killed, 1 one had you,000 displaced and three million homes destroyed. russia continues to give them arms, $1.5 billion. just last week publicly reported sending cash and currency to the assad regime so they continue to pay their military henchmen to keep doing the genocide. turkey that has been doing good humanitarian work on the border with refugee camps for 150,000. it playing a game of russian rule let, it is all about money. the money is greater than ever coming from russia. they're buying natural gas to the tune of almost $35 billion with russia. putin was just in turkey last week on december 3rd and signed 11 different trade agreements. they hope to increase it to 100 billion over the next few years. there is no sign turkey really means what
the administration thought it had to take a lot more assertive action. >> what is the pressure of russia, on moscow to dole with this? they've been backing their ally syria. where are they? >> secretary clinton met with the foreign minister of russia a couple of days ago. obviously russia has backed another loser, its propensity in these things. i think they even see this now. probably the best-case scenario is there's some sort of soft landing where assad is offered an exile deal, gets out of the picture. and then you start the retribution massacres and it could turn into something extremely ugly. the hope is russia will get on board and be constructive. the foreign minister said good things but we'll see what russia does. >> what does an intervention looks like? >> if chemical weapons are used, i think it looks a lot like the air strikes in libya. you have to destroy some of those major stockpiles of chemical weapons. if they start to lose control and there are fores that hezbollah might get ahold of them, you might see some special forces on the ground. the idea of chemical weapons, especially f
aadodop children from russia, but that might come to an end thanks to a acontroversi controversial bill russia's parliament. >>> he's taking a bow. he's getting a second chance at a job he quit five years ago. japan's new prime minister making a stunning comeback. >>> as the sound of gunfire rings out in syrian neighborhoods, the country's military police chief has reported defected to the other side. ng. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and would always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as strong as a love that never fades... if he ever lets her
. for joining us. >> thank you, sandra. sandra: russia says all hope is likely loss for the assad regime in syria warning its collapse is near, almost imminent. now with the power vacuum suck middle east energy security into the chaos? we'll get answers next. >>> plus didn't think the government could throw money away into the wind and out to sea at the same time? oh, how wrong you are. details on a big new venture backed, by yes, your tax dollars. more "money" come being up ♪ ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it iso ride. get the mercedes-benz on your wish list at the winter event going on now through december 31st. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 e350 for $579 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. sandra: is the syrian uprising taking a momen
this compliance. russia appears to want to limit both the influence of the united states and turkey in the south caucasus, but it is unclear to me whether they also seek to minimize iranian's influence. i have followed with great interest turkey's attempts. and my sense is that such a step holds the greatest potential to improve both stability and prosperity in the region. lifting our means isolation would not only allow for greater independence from iranian and russian influence, it would also be mutually beneficial for turkey and her meaning and a number of ways. i'm interested in hearing the panels perspectives on whether this is an issue that turkish and a meaning governments might be able to reengage in. but we can all agree on is this, as i conclude, is that it is in no one's interest to see a nuclear-armed iran. and i look forward to exploring how the south caucasus region and help the united states and europe prevent this outcome. we cannot have that as an outcome. i anxiously await hearing the testimony of our witnesses, again, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure and i think that this he
in moscow as russia steps up its role in helping to find a political resolution to the conflict. the russian parliament says time is running out for damascus. >> it was a high-level meeting between syrian diplomats and the russian foreign minister. he made moscow's line clear -- the crisis has to be solved through political dialogue between the warring parties, but there was no mention of any new proposals to bring about that objective. the foreign ministry denied reports of a new peace plan from russia and the u.s. >> this plan does not exist. that is why it is not being discussed. with mr. brahimi and our american colleagues, we are trying to find a solution on the basis of the peace plan that was agreed upon in june. >> the geneva agreement calls for a cease-fire and the creation of a traditional government, something the united nations special envoy still wants to see. in damascus, he appealed for a government of national unity. >> this government would lead the country in a transitional phase, which would end with new elections. they could be presidential elections if the parties concer
stakeholders' liked iran and russia. >>thank you for your answers. i'm looking for something a little bit more specific. what is the relation between the new coalition and the military council? do you think they can become an administrative body for the revolution or a government in exile as you just described? >> is there a follow-up question? >> the new coalition actually put three things they have to do. the first to form a new government and to form a military council, and in the third thing the to play a role in the humanitarian assistance or humanitarian aid. the debate right now within the new coalition, are we able to form a government until we get it in guarantees from the international community, suc. restated three examples before of government in exile. if there is no recognition of the international community, there is nothing the government in exile can do. the second thing is the financial assistance. i said before, after the formation of the serbian national council, six months we don't have what we need to do. you cannot work as a workin exile with individual budgets. the rela
has denied any intention of using chemical weapons. russia, a key syrian ally, dismissed the intelligence reports as rumors. yesterday in istanbul, russian president vladimir putin said he understands turkey's concerns about border security, but he warned that deploying patriot missiles could raise fears of a wider conflict. meanwhile, inside syria intense fighting flared again near damascus today. amateur video showed government warplanes carrying out new arrayeds. the syrian capital has seen escalating violence in the last week as rebels try to close the noose on president bashar al assad's regime and the military tries to recapture lost ground. amid the fighting, the state news agency reported that rebel more tar fire killed nine students and a teacher at a school outside damascus today. the opposition also reported the incident but did not say who fired the mortar. meanwhile, there are meanwhile, there are indications that russia's position on syria may be changing. the "new york times" reports that the russians had agreed to a new strategy to persuade president assad
? senator clinton -- secretary clinton meeting with russia, what can we do and what's the next step if they don't listen. >> it's a complex world the president is going to lead in. >> can i enter, you cover these issues all the time and did a lead story on nightly news on this topic. the question fors the president is ultimately what do you do when your foreign policy has been premised on bringing american troops home, at a time when american power and influence is needed particularly in the middle east, but there are no easy answers. this i think is what sort of calls out for an obama doctrine in a second term. he doesn't seem to have one at the moment which is a big issue. >> and doesn't have a foreign policy team yet. he's still wrestling with those decisions. more on that to come. david gregory, thank you very much. chris cizilla. coming up sunday on "meet the press," the fiscal cliff debate. the latest between house republican whip kevin mccarthy and assistant senate majority leader dick durbin, the two men who have been at the table. congress hearing from all sides on the fisc
by russia and the u.s. may be the only chance to prevent a sectarian war in syria. >> the situation in syria is very bad. very, very bad and the differences are increasingth >> but most syrians remain skeptical of brahimi's initiative. they say assad and those loyal to him should be discarded from any future deal. army troops have intensefied air strikes across the country. here in the eastern province, fighter jets bombed rebel strongholds. the military is stepping up its campaign to stop the rebels from advancing. there was been mass destruction on the eastern out skirts of damascus where the rebels are holding territory despite con tant air strikes. the siege -- besieged towns bear the brunt of the assault to push the rebels out of damascus. these are the victims of the raging violence in homs. activists say dozens of people were killed by the army, which took the area. on syrian tv, trenches dug by the rebelled to protect themselves from shelling the but in the absence of a decisive military victory, the rebels will have to decide whether to negotiate piecemeal or brace for a prolonged w
.s. is exploring with allies and russia for instance, today. as we reported in the "new york times," the administration is communicating through russia to syria against not only using these chemical weapons but against these type of attacks. >> rose: how do you measure the relationship between the united states and russia on this particular question where they have in a sense -- they are very precise about what they say and they say they are opposed to somebody coming into the country. they're not, as they say, wedded to the assad government. >> that's right. they've taken a different position over the last several months in they're not necessarily wedded to that government. however syria remains the largest arms customer for russian weapons exports. the russians use a military base, a naval base on the syrian coast so they were very important in that sense. but russia obviously wants to maintain influence in the middle east and through syria and if they can't do it through assad regime, perhaps another regime that would still be willing to deal with them could be acceptable. >> ro
're looking at how to prevent something like this from happening again. >>> russia is trying to put the brakes on americans adopting russian children. and today that ban is one step closer to becoming law. d details are next. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. the next big thing? we're going to wake the world up. ♪ and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. ♪ cisco. tomorrow starts here. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb s
to meet with the envoy to syria. across barbra himybill: russia s discussion in moscow. earlier in a week there was a report it was pulling support away from damascus. has that bent case? and why the relationship with russia so critical. >> reporter: it's one of the countries syria will listen to. russia could have sway over syrian president assad. >> the best issue we have is russia. russia stood up and told him to stop the chemical weapons issue and he backed off. but now he's back at it again. >> reporter: if assad does leave the immediate problem for the international community is who will take over in syria. then another key issue is how and who will secure the chemical weapons? bill: we are awaiting word from the pentagon and when that happt to you. martha: sarin gas is one of the world's most dangerous chemical weapons. experts say it has 500 times as toxic quality as cyanide does. 100 milligrams, which is one drop, can kill the average person in minutes if he or she is not given an immediate antedote. bill: syria depend on money from its oil exports. 9% of which are purchased by e
rights violators in russia. it was sparked by the death of a russian lawyer who died died in jail investigating a fraud case at the request of americans in russia. it singles out dozens of russians that police believe are connected to that case. they can't travel to the united states and their assets are frozen. russia has been defiant in this case. it is even launching a posthumous price for the new law and russian voices speaking of saying it's not fair to penalize children. having adopted 60,000 over last two decades, and as you mentioned, there are several dozen cases right now that are pending. several dozen russian children who are in the final stages of this adoption process. those who should be coming to the united states very soon. it is not clear what's going to happen to them. it's very sad because the parents and children have had numerous visits to russia by the parents. the russians have put them through the loops to see the u.s. governm says it will fight to see that these cases come together. but the law is not clear at this point what is going to happen. heather:
rights and supporters say boosts egypt's political stability. >>> and russia's upper house of parliament has approve adverse hal measure banning address adoption of russian children by americans. the legislation goes to putin for signing. this move is seen as retaliation for a law president obama signed earlier this month imposing travel and human rights restrictions. and i'll have a full report on this story later in our 6:00 p.m. hour. every year they have about 1,000 children adopted from russia by americans, but all of that could be put on hold. and it's a unclear also what's going to happen to the cases pending. but again, we'll have much more on the story coming up at 6:00 so people can tune in again. >> can't wait to see it. thanks so much. >>> you're in "the situation room." happening now, a pair of wounded firefighters. welcome to our viewers around the world. you're in "the situation room." we begin with today's heart if the dealt thank you from survivors of a christmas eve shooting. j the firefighters had just arrived at a burning home when a sniper opened fire severely woundi
. russia. the blast ripped through an apartment building in the central city. officials say it happened during construction work. a gas container reportedly exploded on upper level of a 10 story building. dozens of people living nearby had to evacuate. cochings seized record cash of drugs in a mountain village. they found 15 tons of cocaine worth $450 million in an underground chamber beneath the home. traffickers had reportedly felony in the drugs from venezuela. hun hun door honduras a major shipping corridor. caught a rare chinese sturgeon. the indangerred species is said it be so old it lived among the dinosaurs. kept it in a tank where alerting police. officials released it into the sea some 15 miles offshore. belgium a new electronic christmas tree. replacing the famous fir tree. the 70-foot tall creation has led's and video production screen. for a few bucks you can climb its staircase for a full view of the famous plaza. proceeds go to a charity for the homeless and that's a wrap on this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. >> share the holidays with the share everything pla
, and now from n nato. what do we make of this and also the fact that russia has been helpful according to the white house, very helpful, be in trying to persuade syria that this is a red line syria should not cross? >> the noose is tightening. the russians understand the arc on assad is moving south quickly. the turks have finally requested at least defensive patriot batteries, probably patriot batteries designed to deal with missiles rather than aircraft. should they be anti-aircraft patriots you could see an offensive capacity and capability. the rebels in syria are gaining force, maybe a little more coherens to their opposition and against the backdrop of all of this you have another -- yet another report of the prospects of agents being mixed with respect to chemical weapons capacity. i think this is the red line. it's a nightmarish scenario because it would force some sort of military intervention should these chemical weapons and their deployed either artillery shells or cones, the syrians have hundreds, sarin gas, maybe various nerve agents. the united states or nato would have
a symbolic show of force to signal the u.s. will support the defense of turkey. today russia is denying that one of its top diplomats said that president bashar al assad is losing control of his country. nbc is live for us in cairo. he has the latest. ayman, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, lynn. a series of rapid developments inside and outside the country. inside syria, first of all, rebels announced they made very important gains on the outskirts of the city of aleppo and the capital damascus. in aleppo they're reporting to have taken over a military base belonging to the regime and in damascus, they've taken over a military installation on the outside of that country's airport. that also links to the issue of outside support for the syrian regime, including russia which says it will stand by president bashar al assad despite comments yesterday from a senior russian official acknowledging that in fact president ais losing control of that country to the opposition. as you mentioned today, the united states sent a symbolic show of force to turkey and nato member along wi
relationship with russia. i think it was a vote on my behalf and others to say we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia to show that that vote was juft, this is an opportunity to show the international community at large you can be a constructive force at a time of great need and you have the capability to do some good. i find it ironic and red lines are talked about, but the red line here is literally red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me is the most we are all fixated on the method of killing, not the killing itself. for over a year, we have been talking about getting involved and need to stop this before it gets out of hand. we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. it will be hard to go to the syrian people when they achieve their freedom and say we would like to help you and they will say, you did little at a time in our debatest need. we have a chance to correct that impression. from an american national security point of view, if we don't secure these chem
along the syrian-turkish border. >> russia is the one fly in the right man. the foreign minister said he would not block the move. a sign an old ally may be losing patience with president assaad. they hope deploying missiles will help stabilize tensions but the bigger concern is what is happening inside syria itself. specifically, what the regime might do with its stockpile of chemical weapons. syria has used much of its considerable arsenal to crush the rebellion. hidden from view it is believed to have developed a chemical weapons program and there are reports of activity, prompting this uncompromising western message. >> we are concerned for the same reason the united states has. we have sent our own clear, private message directly to them about the serious consequences that would follow from the use of such weapons. >> those consequences are not been spelled out and syria has said it is no intention of using chemical weapons but the deployment of patriot missiles that will take weeks to arrive in turkey will not end this conflict. >> how serious is this koepp merkel wegmanchemical we
francisco today. we bought naval forces from the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last year the united states released a new security strategy. most of you probably have not even heard of that, but i have to tell you this was a big deal. it was one of the fifth american security strategies that we have issued since the civil war. among the highlights of that security strategy was a strong statement that the united states had the highest economic and security interests in the asia pacific region. not in europe as has been for 100 years prior to that, than the asia pacific region. secondly, that we would maintain freedom of access throughout that region. in particular, we would maintain the sea lanes in that area, whatever the challenge might be. even as we reduce our defense budget, therefore we must maintain and would maintain a powerful navy, and that that navy would be charge
over internet use and content. the changes were supported by 89 countries including russia, china, and saudi arabia. >> coming up, as egypt prepares to vote, why is the new constitution so divisive? we will talk about that. >> the fate of children in afghanistan as nato troops prepare to withdraw. >> stay with us. >> welcome back, everyone. each faces a tense weekend. voting begins on a controversial constitution supported by president mohamed morsi. it has deeply divided the country. >> opposition groups are urging supporters to vote against it. morsi oppose the muslim brotherhood is calling on egyptians to support the document. -- morsi's muslim brotherhood is calling the egyptians to support the document. >> opponents said the document does not do enough to protect women and minorities. the leading activist has asked egypt's president to delay the referendum. >> it is shaping up to be a pivotal moment for the country which has witnessed daily violence in the run-up to the referendum. >> we want to get a closer look at some of the most disputed articles of the new constitution.
from potential missile attacks from syria. this comes as russia is backtracking on yesterday's statement that the opposition might actually win there. >> syrian forces bombing rebel positions on the turkish border earlier this year. the wounded brought across to the turkish side. syrian shells have landed on turkish territory itself also causing casualties. it could be vulnerable to serbian missile fire, turkey asked to protect against any such threat, we are deploying two patriot battalions here to turkey, along with the troops that are necessary to man those batteries. so that we can help turkey had a missile defense that they may very well need in dealing with threats that come out of syria. >> the american defense secretary announcing that the u.s. was joining germany and benevolence in providing patriot missiles. does this risk raising the stakes? >> i see these as predominantly a defensive move. i think the assad regime knows it is a defensive move. they can theoretically be used to shoot down planes, this is probably not going to happen. they are far too expensive to u
. secretary of state hillary clinton said today that the united states and russia to get syrian president al-assad to talk about the political transition and syria. she spoke yesterday with russia's for a minister and the u.n. peace envoy to the next conversation with u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford on president assad using chemical weapons. investor four was part of an event held by the foundation for defense of democracy is yesterday. this is about half an hour. >> the good morning. very nice to be here. let me thank andy for that very kind introduction and i would also like to thank john for inviting me here to talk to the foundation for the defense of democracy st. john and i go way back to when we were in iraq together. another tough situation where we were trying to help promote space change in the middle east. i am only going to talk for about ten minutes and then i would welcome some questions and a little more of a discussion. so just listening to me drone on. i want to take just one minute and give you my sense of the situation on the ground and syria, which is changing. and
are not meant to destabilize the already uneasy relationship with russia as the spokesman at home urged now to join the international community in helping to ease bashar al-assad. >>shepard: thank you from the state department. that is the reporting. now the context and perspective. now to the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for near east policy a "american bandstand" group of scholars whose mission is to advance america's interests overseas. how big a move is this movement of chemical weapons? what does it tell us in the big picture? >>guest: it is very significant. it highlights the desperation of assad regime, the fact he is mixing the recursors of sarin gas, that is a scare tactic for us to keep us out of it, and, also, warning the people of syria he could be prepared to use these if he is brought down. >>shepard: based on what the united states has said and not said or done, what is the united states goal? >>guest: the united states does not want to be involved militarily. 40,000 dead on the ground that we know and another 40,000 missing and likely
or russia. u.n. secretary general was asked about the asylum question today he did not seem to favor the idea. listen. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity whoever commits gross violation of human rights must be held accountable and should be brought to justice. >> that sentiment was echoed by officials at the u.s. state department who said there has to be, quote: accountability. the counter argument to that is that perhaps anything that gets assad out of syria and stops the slaughter of civilians might be worth thinking about, harris. >> some people may be wondering what happens if in fact assad does go. we still haven't seen united opposition of all those rebels to replace him. >> we certainly have not seen anything like a united opposition. the rebels say that he they are seeking more of a unified political leadership but it is hard to come by because there are so many groups involved in pposition movement from secular democrats who began this simply as a way to gain more democracy in syria to hard line islamist and even al qaeda groups. one of those hard line groups
arab ya and the united states and russia and the european countries. what happened in lebanon -- if left to themselves, lebanon -- which is another sad story -- they might have been able to compromise and come together as they did on a number of occasion before re '7s and '80s, and work things out somehow. find some sort of system and muddle through this. but as they say in real estate, location is everything. and lebanon being between syria and israel, and of course syria itself being on the border of israel, lebanon, iraq, south of turkey, you're not going to be -- you cannot be the switzerland over the middle east. are going to have outside influences which usually exacerbate the situation and lengthen the time of the civil war. >> and so let's talk a little bit now, shifting the perspective, to the personal connections that you have to the house of assad. i would love for you to give us a good feel for, who is this man who is the president and how did he change over the time that you've known him? seems like there was a definitive time around 2005-2006 that you say he shif
of state hillary clinton held a news conference. keep in mind, russia here, really, resisted the efforts to speed the departure of the syrian leader al assad. so jill, do we know, was syria's chemical weapons, was that discussed here in this conversation between the secretary of state and the foreign minister of russia? >> reporter: well, yes. initially. there are actually two meetings between secretary clinton and the foreign minister. and you know, russia actually does -- this is one area where they do agree. russia is very much opposed to any type of use of chemical weapons and in fact secretary clinton thanked him for speaking about that which she did in brussels just yesterday, talking about that. although, brooke, you know, you have to say that the russians next breath say that they have raised that issue, in fact, with bashar al assad. the president of syria. and he assures them that there's no use intended and it is not a problem and, so, you kind of have two messages coming from the russians but you would have to say they're very much opposed to that and a lot of concern. >> so
. >> thank you. the senate just approved a trading relationship with russia, a vote on my behave and others saying we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia so show that vote was justifieded, and an opportunity for russia to show the international community at large that you can be a constructive force in great time of need and a great kate as a nation to do good. i find it ironic, and the red line here literally is red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me the most is we are all on the on the mitt of killing, not the killing i.t. itself. we have to get involved age stop this before it's out of hand. what are we talking about? we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. america not being involved in this constructive way will be hard to go to the libyan -- excuse me, the syria people when they achieve freedom say we want to help you, and they will say, how are y'all? you did little in the time of need. we have a chance in the late hours of the fight to correct that i'll prese
of the largest stockpiles in the world, they could be third after the u.s. and russia. there's not a lot of information on the exact location. options in terms of preemptively taking care of the chemical weapons are difficult. one option would be to send ground troops in. it is a hostile environment. the pentagon estimates there could be as many as 75,000 troops that would be needed to do that. another option would be to preemptively bomb but then you have dispersal of the agents and so forth. a third would try to seek some sort of property to go in and secure the site. it is a very difficult set of issues as president obama has clearly noted in the clip and has drawn a clear line on the use by the assaad regime. host: here is where syria is located in the middle east. adjacent to 11 on, i rock, and turkey. this civil war has not been going on 21 months. how has he been able to retain power? -- they are adjacent to lebanon, iraq, and turkey. guest: there have been times in the past when a bomb attack killed four members of his inner circle and people thought it could be the beginning of
clinton met yesterday with the foreign minister from russia and conor powell is live on the story for us in the middle east bureau in jerusalem. are they starting to shift what has been a very strong alliance away from syria? >> reporter: well, martha, russia along with iran have been the biggest backers of the assad regime. russia sent weapons to the syrian government. they protected the syrian government in the u.n. that does appear it could be changing. secretary of state hillary clinton met with russian foreign minister sergei lavrov yesterday in dublin and officials described it as a good meeting, a positive meeting. there seemed to be a an air of compromise in this meeting. past meetings have been hostile with very negative, with little done. both sides yelling at each other, arguing with each other. according to officials this past meeting seemed to be much more constructive. there seemed to be effort to find common ground. where that will actually lead in terms of ending the violence in syria is still very much unknown, martha. martha: boy, that is what diplomacy is all about and
international community into this game. that includes russia, which has been on the sidelines actually arming the syrian government until now, but hopefully russia, no one wants to see syria use, again it was reported in 1982 that hall fa al assad used chemical weapons on his people. our government again is reported to be moving to recognize this more unified opposition. the fact that it exists is partially a credit to secretary of state clinton, but also to egypt and other neighbors who have pushed for this to happen. its headquarters is currently in cairo, by the way. and so if this happens and if the international community focuses i think there is finally a chance of a -- not just a way for the end of this -- the assad regime to be achieved, but for a responsible government to move into its place. >> and now let me ask you, move you to the israeli/u.s. relationship, because israel has now taken one more step, first last week as we reported they took a key step in deciding to build this e-1 settlement which if they were to proceed, is a red line, i know that the british have warned them th
the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter, she says you know, what's wrong with russia? russia was the soviet union and she said what's that? it's a big thing in the late 80s and early '90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never really considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which winning was a forgone conclusion, you you no? the terrorism thing caught us by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rousers and never gave them too much credit. interesting enough all the buildings in khobar were told by the bin laden construction company and they had the bin laden stamps on all of the buildings. how is that for irony? but after that things kind of changed and the world trade center bombings and september 11 of course, we all know what happened that day. i was actually flying that morning and had come back from the middle east from another
missiles could mean for the larger conflict. alisyn: that is good context. what is russia saying now about the assad regime? >> reporter: yesterday they came out and said, all right, we think there is a possibility president assad would fall. this is one of those things speaking to truth as this russian diplomat did may not exactly jive with the party line. inside baseball here as russia came out today and forcefully gotten behind president assad said, no, no, our diplomat was misquoted. he was saying what the opposition was saying. a little fanciful. there was hope as the humanitarian crisis increases inside syria there are many more hundreds if not thousands of people dying inside syria that russia may be loosening ties to president assad. sadly for the united states and allies we found out that russia is continuing to hold fast with president assad their long time ally and happy to see him kill as many of his own citizens as he would like. alisyn: thanks leland. bill: you think about the last two years of headlines and think about this region how much it dominated the coverage we've had
and russia working there. we were told that we could earn $200 a month. >> ( translated ): i can't say i was very happy or excited. i worried a bit because we were heading for a foreign country. we hoped everything would be okay. >> narrator: turkey has become one of the largest markets for women trafficked from ukraine and the old soviet bloc. its lax visa requirements make it an easy port of entry to europe and the middle east for traffickers like olga. >> she got through customs with absolutely no problem. the traffickers who transport these women have a very easy time of it. because the women know that they're going to be working illegally in the country that they're going to, they actually help the trafficker by lying to the customs officials. at this point we didn't know exactly what she was going to do. she didn't know where she was going to go. we didn't know what kind of vehicle she would have. all we knew is that she often goes to a cafe and sells the girls. that's what we had heard. >> narrator: the plan is to keep on olga's trail in istanbul and see where the women in her gro
in maryland. we're gonna tell you why. >>> heart break for families trying to adopt from russia. we'll have more on the ban signed by president putin. >>> first here's a look at last night's winning lottery numbers. >> it's like taking candy from a baby, only this candy could cost that baby his or her identity. child identity theft is unfortunately not uncommon in the state of maryland. cable accounts could be opened in your child's name. now we have a law to try and stop that from happening. the first state in the nation to do it. sara sam son has more. >> a recent study finds one in ten children have had their social security numbers compromised in some way. according to the maryland attorney general's office, that's the low estimate. that's because some victims don't know they are victims. >> a child won't find out until they get to be an age where they have to apply for credit. >> a new law going into effect january 1st aims to keep kid's identity safe. the legislation is the first of its kind in the country. >> we want to make sure that children and other protective persons have an opp
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